What else can pick and mix teach us?

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A while back I wrote an article on what pick and mix could teach us about pricing. It focused on the recent move towards fixed price cups and drew a comparison to our bookkeeping services. You can read the article here.

While on a family break at the weekend I discovered another lesson from pick and mix. When I was younger it wasn’t called pick and mix. It was simply loose sweets in large jars. The shopkeeper would weigh them out and put them into a paper bag. My favourite was always sherbet straws. Even writing this brings back fond memories. This resource is only available to members. To access it, login or join now as a free member [/MM_Member_Decision]

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A while back I wrote an article on what pick and mix could teach us about pricing. It focused on the recent move towards fixed price cups and drew a comparison to our bookkeeping services. You can read the article here.

While on a family break at the weekend I discovered another lesson from pick and mix. When I was younger it wasn’t called pick and mix. It was simply loose sweets in large jars. The shopkeeper would weigh them out and put them into a paper bag. My favourite was always sherbet straws. Even writing this brings back fond memories.

Back then, the sweets were sold in quantities of a quarter of a pound, approximately 113g. When we became metric, the price didn’t change, but the quantity it bought you did. Instead of 113g, it became 100g.

I’ve been watching recently, and it doesn’t really matter where you go, loose sweets or pick and mix seem to be priced per 100g. This is great when the prices are 89p per 100g or 99p per 100g, but what happens when the prices get above the magic £1? Does that influence our decisions to buy? sweets Right now, I’m happy spending £1 on a sweet, but would I spend £1.10? Imagine my interest when I saw the sign above. The price is still 99p, but the eagle eyed among you will notice that it’s no longer for 100g, but rather just 90g. That’s still £1.10 per 100g, but how much more attractive does it look? Would they sell as much if the sign said £1.10 per 100g, or does that anchor of over £1 put people off?

The same has happened over recent years with everything from chocolate bars, to washing powder. The quantity gets less, but the price seems to be attractive.

This is about repositioning. Taking something we are familiar with, and packaging the offering in a slightly different way to make it seem more attractive.

How can you repackage your bookkeeping service to make it seem more attractive?

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